Monthly Archives: December 2012

Best photos of 2012 from around the world

To match my previous post featuring some of my favourite photos from Australia, below is a select few pictures from Bangladesh, Haiti and Timor-Leste.

2012 has been an incredible year, it has provided a healthy number of challenges and rewards while it has also pushed me to think differently about visual storytelling. I look forward to continuing to grow, learn, document, travel, share, observe, record, produce as much of life that is possible.

 

Bangladesh

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved.  A man pulls out his cycle cart from a line of others along the Buriganga river in Old town Dhaka.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. A man pulls out his cycle cart from a line of others along the Buriganga river in Old town Dhaka.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Men working as vegetable carriers in Kawran Bazaar in downtown Dhaka sleep during the middle of the day.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Men working as vegetable carriers in Kawran Bazaar in downtown Dhaka sleep during the middle of the day.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. A women stands outside her home in Jaliakhali village in southern Bangladesh. Jaliakhali like many other villages built along river banks in the Dacope region is increasingly vulnerable to cyclone and the impacts of climate change.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. A women stands outside her home in Jaliakhali village in southern Bangladesh. Jaliakhali like many other villages built along river banks in the Dacope region is increasingly vulnerable to cyclone and the impacts of climate change.

Haiti

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. A boy hides in the bushes in a game of 'hide and seek' that covers the entire Children's Village compound.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Empty streets in downtown Port-au-Prince that were badly devastated during the earthquake in 2010. Casualties from the earthquake included more than 200,000 dead as well as 1.7 million homeless.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Young boys play outside their families makeshift shelter on a street in down town Port-au-Prince.

 

Timor-Leste

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Albert Da Costa Dajeus never attended school as a child, at age 10 he started working on his family’s plot, now at 67 Albert believes he is strong enough to work the land for another 10 years.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Certain parts of the market in Baucau newtown are filled with stagnant water after unusually late rains and little drainage to escape.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Police officers inspect the damage to the front windows of Hotel Timor after protestors threw rocks at the hotel during May Day protests on May 1st 2012.

Best of 2012 (Newcastle AU)

As 2012 draws to a close I decided to share some of my favourite pictures all of which were taken in Newcaslte Australia during 2012.

 

The Shed is a personal project following a unique individual who inhabits a simple dwelling in a bohemian community known as ‘The Moz’. This simple life allows Geordie to focus his energy into amongst other things into skinning road kill animals to tan leather as well as preserving birds found on the roadside.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. Geordie Malone creates a dense smoke by adding piles of fresh eucalyptus leaves to the fire outside his shed and caravan

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. A flood light shatters through the scrub and lands on the Geordie's caravan.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. A Barn Owl found dead on the side of a highway has its wings cut off so they can be dried and then bound together.

 

Engage Newcastle is a commission project for Newcastle University documenting a range of the communities, cultures and sub-cultures that makes up the cities unique social landscape. These pictures below are taken during two periods of June and December 2012.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. Members of the Newcastle Urban Farmers group pick and eat oranges from a food forest located just outside Newcastle.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. Terry Hilder rolls a cigarette in between his turn to bowl at the Stockton Bowling Club. Terry originally from Trangie in rural NSW has lived in Stockton for 15 years but still doesn't consider himself a local.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. Swimmers in the '50 and over' age category carry out final stretches before competing in an annual 2km ocean swim across Newcastle beaches.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. Members of 'the squadron' a supporters group for Newcastle Jets FC, watch on with anticipation as rivals Central Coast score second goal to seal the victory.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved. A group using stand up paddle boards move through Newcastle's harbour past the fishing co-operative.

Parkour

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Members of Newcastle's parkour group train atop of iconic urban locations in the heart of the city.

Earlier in the year as part of the first leg of the Engage Newcastle project I had the pleasure of spending a  training session with Newcastle’s parkour crew. As I chatted via facebook with Bryce one of the main organisers (bottom left photo in above sequence) he sent me links to youtube videos featuring some crews from around the world including this group from Lisbon.  Bryce tried his best to convince me that while the Newcastle group weren’t jumping across balconies of apartment blocks, they were maximising what Newcastle’s concrete landscape offered.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Members of Newcastle's parkour group become acquainted with recently established scaffolding.

In search of how best to describe parkour, google led to a myriad of links, Wikipedia states   parkour is a sport that practitioners aim to move from one place to another, negotiating the obstacles in between. The discipline uses no equipment and is non-competitive. A male practitioner is generally called a “traceur”, a female a “traceu” . This link at Parkour Generations had some interesting writing about Parkour and where it has largely been formed, sourced its inspiration etc.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Members of Newcastle parkour group using parts of the city for their training.

For those out there looking to learn more about parkour go no further than google, youtube or any social media platform to get a taste.

Carols by candle light

 

It has been quite a number years since I have been along to ‘carols by candle light’ an annual event held in Newcastle’s iconic Kind Edward Park. This year I was in attendance, I made my way up and over the hill to be greeted by the park, a lovely natural amphitheatre that overlooks the ocean. I wasn’t wearing Christmas colours, nor did I have a candle or a song booklet, but rather I was there at this annual event as part of the ongoing Engage Newcastle project.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. People line up for ice cream from a Mr Whippy van at Carols by candle light in Newcastle, Australia.

Earlier in the year I spent two weeks documenting my home town of Newcastle as part of a commissioned project by Newcastle University. During this time I documented more than 30 interesting communities, cultures and sub-cultures, the edit of my favourite photographs are now on my website under the NGO & commissioned page.

The thousands of people that managed to cram into the natural ampitheatre was a visual overload, after a few rings around the park I eventually found that the most interesting photographs I made were not the cowboy-hat-wearing choir or the sea of candles but rather  silent moments along the fringes. While the quite fringes were more visually compelling I am in now way implying that the sense of community present isnt interesting, in fact I was amazed at the numbers of Novacastrians that turned up.

 

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Siblings stand for a photograph during the annual carols in the park.

 

Despite personal questions around the commercialisation of Christmas, watching parents and children sing the regular Christmas carols I realised how important such an event must be for many of these children. I still vividly remember being one of those kids.

In the photograph below young men line up to buy pluto pups. Before taking this picture I watched the line slowly move along as people ordered foods from the iconic stall. After taking three photographs in this sequence for some unknown reason my camera seized up and stopped working. The camera was only 6 months old, I felt ripped off, I mused that maybe it was the high oil content in the air from the vats at the stall, but most likely just bad timing.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Men order pluto pups and hot chips from a fast food stall at the carols.

 

Timor Remember

Timor Remember

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. The crumbling Portuguese market in old town of Baucau, Timor-Leste

The past year on the move has left too many projects in pieces and sadly neglected. Since settling into my new work space in Sydney I have slowly picture by picture had a chance to return to a few projects one of which is Timor Remember.

With this project my interest lies in exploring Timor through three stages of its recent history, Portugese colonialism, Indonesian occupation and young independence. Using the mediums of 120 black and white film, diary entries and excerpts from interviews I am seeking to create a body of work that investigates  the turbulent past that paved the way to Timor-Leste’s independence.

Returning to Timor-Leste in early 2013 I am hoping to travel to parts of the small island nation I haven’t visited previously to continue work for this project.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. A cow tied to a tree with its eyes covered, this is a normal preparation before slaughtering animals usually for weddings, funerals or other important occasions.

Here is a link to my photo essay featured in The Big Issue magazine earlier in the year. While the entire edit of the story Timor in progress is here on my website. One of my photographs taken on assignment for Red Cross Australia ran here in The Australian.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved. Men fishing in the late afternoon off the edge of a wharf in Dili.

Phone photography in new town

To continue on from my last post about phone photography I have included below two small collections of photos taken on my phone of my new life around me in Sydney.

Confident dirty Ibis’s patrol the alleyway behind my place in search of food, usualy procured from rubbish bins.

Photos- Conor Ashleigh © 20120 All rights resered. Urban Ibis on duty.

A further collection of moments from around my place.