Monthly Archives: August 2014

NuPhoto slide night in Newcastle

If you are a Novocastrian that enjoys photography we would love to see you next Wednesday, September 3rd, 6-9pm @ 754 Hunter St Newcastle. The evening will feature presentations of work from some of Newcastle’s most exciting photographers. In addition to photography, this year we will also be screening short films thanks to two Newcastle film makers.

Below is a taste of to expect on the evening.

A photograph from Jon Reid’s series The Captain Cook Graving Dock.

Photo: Jon Reid © 2014. A photograph from Jon Reid's series The Captain Cook Graving Dock.

Photo: Jon Reid © 2014.

A photo from a project Max has been working on over recent road trips through rural NSW.

Photo: Max Mason Hubers © 2014. A photo from a series Max has been working on over recent road trips through rural NSW.

Photo: Max Mason Hubers © 2014.

A photo from Ryan Fitzgerald’s powerful work.

Photo: Ryan Fitzgerald © 2014. A series from Ryan Fitzgerald's powerful work.

Photo: Ryan Fitzgerald © 2014.

Film still from Victoria Coffey’s film Callum’s Milky Way.

Photo: Victoria Coffey © 2014. Film still from Victoria Coffey's film Callum's Milky Way.

Photo: Victoria Coffey © 2014.

 

A photograph from my long-term project Stories of the South.

Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

The full line up is yet to be finally confirmed but in addition to those above we will also be showing work from
Mayeta Clark
Simone Darcy
and more.

The event will be a BYO affair so if you fancy a drink you are welcome to bring something along.

Mazie Turner, learning to say farewell to a friend, mentor and wonderful human.

Mazie reaches past at home in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

Mazie reaches past at home in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

 

Last month many people in Australia mourned the loss of an extraordinary artist and all round wonderful human, Mazie Turner. Mazie was a mother of three children, a committed artist and woman that lived life to its fullest at all times. I attribute to Mazie a large part of my love for photography and visual media in general. Without question I wouldn’t be who I am and where I am now if it wasn’t for her influence.

Mazie and daughter Grace at a cafe in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

I met Mazie when I was 19 years old and I had first started dating her daughter Grace Turner. Grace is a gifted singer-songwriter, I encourage all to listen to her music. I met Mazie at a time when my interest in photography was starting to grow. While I have never formally studied photography or visual arts, I see my tutelage under Mazie as critical to my creative formation and also more broadly how I understand my place in the world. Mazie had always encouraged me to pursue the craft of photography and creative expression in general. In 2010, I started sharing a studio with her at the Newcastle Community Arts Centre. It was there, literally surrounded by creativity at every turn that my sense of visual communication began to develop and at the same time I think it was when I started becoming a man.

Mazie brushes her teeth in her studio in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

Mazie brushes her teeth in her studio in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

Whether it is the way I make my scrambled eggs, the way I relentlessly fill diaries with notes and lists, or listening to radio national with a cup of tea, I regularly catch myself doing things I adopted from Mazie. I am not entirely sure if these little homages to her are a conscious salute to someone I cared deeply for or just recognizable examples of how significant Mazie is in my life.

One of Mazie paint brushes  inside her studio in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

One of Mazie paint brushes inside her studio in Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

It was over the summer of December 2011 – February 2012 we reached our peak of time shared in the studio. From our first coffee in the morning through to a quick bite of Indian in the evening before skipping back to the studio to continue working, our routines surrounding our work in our studios were more or less indistinguishable. I won’t forget the many thoughtful conversations we had on the long red lounge as we pored over my negatives that lay illuminated on Mazie’s lightbox or as we looked at a new edit of my recent work.

Mazie and her sister Sarah in Bellingen, NSW.  Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

Mazie and her sister Sarah in Bellingen, NSW. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

When Mazie passed away in June this year I was in Kiribati on assignment. I didn’t return to Australia for the funeral. The decision was incredibly hard for me to make. I desperately wanted to be back in Newcastle saying goodbye to my friend surrounded by the hundreds of others who loved her just as much as I did. The main reason I didn’t go back is that I know Mazie would have wanted me to stay in Kiribati. Mazie always encouraged me to pursue my dreams and this meant regularly following stories wherever they lead. I know that I was loved.

Mazie stands in her studio, Newcastle, Australia.  Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.

Mazie stands in her studio, Newcastle, Australia. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2014.