Posts Tagged: photography

Finding Gule Wankulu in Malawi

Some sets of pictures from my time in Malawi.

Some sets of pictures from my time in Malawi.

This past August I was on assignment in Malawi as part of a long term commissioned book project I am doing for the Marist Brothers Bicentenary in 2017. The Marist Brothers are a Catholic order of Brothers who have communities in more than 80 countries around the world.

As my taxi drove through the scorched red-earth hills between the airport and Lilongwe I noticed these two colourfully dressed characters bounding between the bushes. I asked my cab driver to stop and when they were moving past the car my driver asked them where they were going and I managed to take this portrait of the Gule Wankulu.

As the cab drove over the parched red hills surrounding Malawi's capital Lilongwe I noticed two bounding colourful creatures along the edge of the scrub. They were Gule Wamkulu's and I was transfixed. Gule Wamkulu is both a secret could and ritual dance practiced among the Chewa people in Malawi, Zambia, and Mozambique. It is performed by members of the Nyau brotherhood, which is a sort of a secret society of initiated Chewa men. I was Lucky to stumble across is fascinating characters three times during my trip to Malawi.

As the cab drove over the parched red hills surrounding Malawi’s capital Lilongwe I noticed two bounding colourful creatures along the edge of the scrub. They were Gule Wamkulu’s and I was transfixed. Gule Wamkulu is both a secret could and ritual dance practiced among the Chewa people in Malawi, Zambia, and Mozambique. It is performed by members of the Nyau brotherhood, which is a sort of a secret society of initiated Chewa men. I was Lucky to stumble across is fascinating characters three times during my trip to Malawi.

I was totally amazed by what I had seen and as we drove off I asked the driver to tell me all about the Gule Wankulu. It wasn’t until I could get and read up on the Gule Wankulu cult of Malawi. Twice more on my trip I stumbled upon the Gule Wankulu. They were both on dirt roads in central Malawi, an area dominated by the Chewa ethnic group who the Gule Wankulu cult belongs to.

 

Gule Wamkulu's we stumbled upon at night time in rural Malawi.

Gule Wamkulu’s we stumbled upon at night time in rural Malawi.

 

Of my two other interactions, the above nighttime gulewankulu picture was the most fascinating. Driving home around 8pm we slowed down as these two straw made creatures lurched down the road towards us. My driver a Marist Brother from the Chewa group told me they were transporting the Gule’s to the neighbouring village’s cemetery to be used the following day during a funeral ceremony.

 

Two kids in rural Malawi dressed up as Gule Wankulu trying to earn some money. I was told this is a common practice during school holidays as families try to find extra ways to raise money for school costs.

Two kids in rural Malawi dressed up as Gule Wankulu trying to earn some money. I was told this is a common practice during school holidays as families try to find extra ways to raise money for school costs.

 

When not spotting Gule Wankulu’s I was I was rather busy working in this commissioned bicentenary book project. Unfortunately more info about it will remain under wraps for the coming 6 months at least. In the mean time here are a few more pictures from my time in Malawi. You can see a few pics below.

 

Some sets of pictures from my time in Malawi.

Some sets of pictures from my time in Malawi.

Vanuatu – focusing on its rich cocoa opportunities at this time of disaster

As you will all have seen on the news recently, Cyclone Pam has just devastated Vanuatu on a level never seen before in the small Pacific nation. Current death toll stands at 24  people. The government, aid organisations and local communities are scrambling to help those affected, particularly those on remote islands. To anyone wanting to help, a dear friend and long time Vanuatu resident recommended supporting the local health organisation Promed. They are currently at $70,000 and hoping to reach their target of $100, 000, their page is here.

I am deeply saddened by this natural disaster and at this time I am thinking of the many cocoa farmers and their families on Malekula Island whom I filmed and interviewed in August 2014. The film I made for  for Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research​ followed cocoa from bean to bar in the Pacific nation. ACIAR is working with cocoa co operatives and farmers to increase aspects of the cocoa’s post-production so that the beans can be sold to niche markets in Australia and beyond. The film can be seen below.

A big part of the story was a chocolate competition organised by Sandrine Wallez the inspiration and indefatigable founder of ACTIV Association and Director of Island Chocolates. Sandrine with the support of Randy Stringer from University of Adelaide who is working for ACIAR managing the project, they held a brilliant chocolate tasting competition with a panel of judges that included Ben Kolly from Haighs Chocolate in Adelaide and Josh, March and Jacqui Bahen from Bahen & Co in Margaret River. For any serious chocolate lovers you would already know about these two chocolate makers, if you don’t this is perfect time to have a high quality chocolate experience this Easter!

A great part of the chocolate tasting competition was that Josh and Mark Bahen from Bahen & Co thought the quality of the beans had improved markedly since their last visit two years earlier. They thought the beans were so good that they imagined being able to start buying directly from the farmers in the coming seasons. Recent news from the cocoa growing communities featured in this video above is that they will be back up and running in 6-12 months. I hope it is closer to 6 than 12 months and that we have news they may even be directly selling to Australia’s highest quality chocolate makers.Once I have any news I will be sure to let all know.

A cocoa farmer on Malekula Island from Rory Village, holds a handful of beans. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2015.

A cocoa farmer on Malekula Island from Rory Village, holds a handful of beans. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2015.

 

Cocoa farmers on Malekula Island from Rory Village stand amongst thier crops. During the chocolate tasting competition Rory Village won with the best chocolate. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2015.

Cocoa farmers on Malekula Island from Rory Village stand amongst thier crops. During the chocolate tasting competition Rory Village won with the best chocolate. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2015.

With wonder into the country

Maryam swims in a thermal pool close to the Yarrangobilly Caves located in the Snowy Mountains of New South Wales. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Maryam swims in a thermal pool close to the Yarrangobilly Caves located in the Snowy Mountains of New South Wales. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

SUMMER by Bernard O’Dowd 

I see a grassy couch

Under a canopy of leaves;

A reedy river murmers by,

Crooning an old, old melody

Tuned to a long-forgotten scale,

Made when the world was young.

 

 

A double rainbow appears in the morning outside Berry on the south coast of NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

A double rainbow appears in the morning outside Berry on the south coast of NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Why can the experience of going into the country be so powerful?

A young woman basks in the spray from the waterfall at Protesters Falls in the Nightcap National Park, northern NSW.  Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

A young woman basks in the spray from the waterfall at Protesters Falls in the Nightcap National Park, northern NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Why does is take leaving an urban environment to evoke that powerful feeling of excitement and wonder in us?

 

Omar throws a bucket into the families empty pool in northern NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Omar throws a bucket into the families empty pool in northern NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

 

My girlfriend came to live in Australia 7 years ago and since then like many migrants she has called Sydney home. By contrast I was born in Wagga Wagga but by age of 6 we moved to Kyogle, a small country town on the north coast of NSW. We then relocated to Newcastle where I attended high school and journeyed through adolescence.

 

Maryam rests in a hammock at a friends home in Kyogle, northern NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Maryam rests in a hammock at a friends home in Kyogle, northern NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

While I spent the first 12 years of my life living in rural Australia. It is now in adulthood that I have been able to appreciate the value of growing up outside  the city. I currently share my life with a woman who grew up in a different city, culture and landscape. I love watching her explore the bush, bumpy roads and waterways, some of which I know well. Since exploring rural Australia together I have been able to capture moments of Maryam that highlight the wonder that also lives in my memory from a childhood in rural Australia.  Photographing her exploration across this landscape and seeing the world through her excited eyes makes it possible for me to convey a sense I believe many of us can relate to.

Omar sleeps. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Omar sleeps. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Ben Latta lies on the grass before a surf at Point Plomber on the mid north coast of NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Ben Latta lies on the grass before a surf at Point Plomber on the mid north coast of NSW. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013. All rights reserved.

Omar swings on a gate at home in northern NSW, Australia. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013.

Omar swings on a gate at home in northern NSW, Australia. Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

The back story to my assignment in the Central African Republic

From Nairobi it took me three flights and what felt like an eternity before I touched down in Bangui the capital of the Central African Republic.

An empty hotel in downtown Bangui. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

An empty hotel in downtown Bangui. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

As I moved through the airport with the other strange assortment of passangers I was greeted with the familiar sense of official chaos I know well. Despite my time spent poring over as much writing as I could find about the country I realised very quickly how little I knew as I looked around the airport. I stood in line for my visa actively perspiring as I looked on perplexed at the soldiers in a vast assortment of army uniforms all whom were unarmed. What I didn’t initially realise is that these soldiers were members of the FOMAC force working alongside the French forces to protect key sites around the capital including the airport and French embassy.

Men paddle canoes along the Congo River which divides Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo. In March 2013 the Seleka rebels overthrew Preisident Bozize and took the capital Bangui. Hearing of the Seleka approaching thousands of young men escaped across the Congo River into DRC in fear of being killed by the Seleka Rebels. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Men paddle canoes along the Congo River which divides Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo. In March 2013 the Seleka rebels overthrew Preisident Bozize and took the capital Bangui. Hearing of the Seleka approaching thousands of young men escaped across the Congo River into DRC in fear of being killed by the Seleka Rebels. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

A short intro for those who don’t know much about the place commonly known as C.A.R. The Central African Republic is a landlocked country bordering Chad in the north, Sudan in the northeast, South Sudan in the east, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of Congo in the south and Cameroon in the west. Colonised by the French in the 1880s, C.A.R. became  independent in 1960 but after a number of leaders and coups it wasn’t until 1993 when multi-party democratic elections were held for the first time. Earlier this year on March 24 a coup led by the Seleka leader Michel Djotodia took the capital and seized power from President Bozize who fled the country. According to the International Crisis Group it is estimated that there are about 400,000 internally displaced people, 64,000 refugees.

Men paddle canoes along the Congo River which divides Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo. In March 2013 the Seleka rebels overthrew Preisident Bozize and took the capital Bangui. Hearing of the Seleka approaching thousands of young men escaped across the Congo River into DRC in fear of being killed by the Seleka Rebels. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Men paddle canoes along the Congo River which divides Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo. In March 2013 the Seleka rebels overthrew Preisident Bozize and took the capital Bangui. Hearing of the Seleka approaching thousands of young men escaped across the Congo River into DRC in fear of being killed by the Seleka Rebels. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Eventually after close to two sweaty hours of waiting, Sylvester from the SOS Children’s Village national office successfully managed to arrange permission for me to leave the airport without a visa. For the record, the visa was something I literally had stamped in my passport hours before I left the country a week later, first time for everything. As we left the airport I was surprised to look around and see the heavily armed French soldiers stationed at the entrance. Bumping along a road with minimal paving that led us into downtown Bangui I tried to suck in as much as I could from the darkness but all I could catch was the whir of street sellers standing over their glowing coals that slowly cooked corn and meat. Inside the taxi, Sylvester apologised repeatedly for the mode of transport. He told me how the Children’s Village cars were stolen a few months pripr when the Seleka rebels took over the village and demanded money, computers, vehicles and anything else of value which they said they had earnt as unpaid fighters in Seleka force.

The Seleka who seized power earlier in 2013 is a rebel force made up of fighters from the north of the country as well as large contingents from neighbouring Chad and Darfur. While the conflict wasn’t waged along sectarian lines, in recent months it has become evident that animosity is growing between the largely Christian population and the Muslims from the north.

A convoy of Seleka rebels drive through downtown Bangui. Since the Seleka rebels overthrew the President in March the capital has been wracked by violence and uncertainty. While there is technically a ceasefire in place between the Seleka rebels and the MONUC peace keeping force, many sites including the market are still filled with armed Seleka rebels. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

A convoy of Seleka rebels drive through downtown Bangui. Since the Seleka rebels overthrew the President in March the capital has been wracked by violence and uncertainty. While there is technically a ceasefire in place between the Seleka rebels and the MONUC peace keeping force, many sites including the market are still filled with armed Seleka rebels. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

We stopped outside a rather nice hotel and was told that it was is too dangerous to reach the children’s village at night time. Sylvester told me that since the Seleka rebels came to power it is very rare to drive at night unless part of a French convoy or moving with the Seleka rebels. I checked into the hotel and unsurprisingly was the only guest.In the morning we continued on to the SOS children’s village where I was based from my week in the country. Unfortunately due to security issues we weren’t able to leave the capital and at all times I was accompanied by the writer and a member of the country office.

Balet Patrice, 72 years old, was shot by the Seleka rebels in March 2013. Balet was returning home from visiting one of his children when he heard gunfire, he hid in a house when the next moment a bullet pierced his arm and then passed through his back. Balet and his children cant afford medical treatment, his recovery has been almost non existent. At present Balet has very little feeling in his hand and cant lift his left arm without support. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Balet Patrice, 72 years old, was shot by the Seleka rebels in March 2013. Balet was returning home from visiting one of his children when he heard gunfire, he hid in a house when the next moment a bullet pierced his arm and then passed through his back. Balet and his children cant afford medical treatment, his recovery has been almost non existent. At present Balet has very little feeling in his hand and cant lift his left arm without support. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Visiting the local area surrounding the Childrens Village it was evident that many people were still living in an active state of fear since the invasion by the rebels in March. Bangui is only divided from the Democratic Republic of Congo by the wide and fast running Congo River. As word grew of the impending invasion of the capital thousands of young men fled into neighbouring Congo as they feared being attacked by the rebels. A number of people we interviewed had lost a family members, most males, at the hands of the rebels. In addition to murdering the Seleka also looted from countless homes Non Government Organisations and government offices.

 

The health clinic at the Childrens Village is headed up by the charismatic Dr Placide Bassenge. Dr Placide leads a team of overworked health carers who have struggled to respond to the growing need and minimal resources available since the Seleka invasion. Medical supply routes from neighbouring Cameroon have been closed since March. This means acquiring medical supplies such as sterilising equipment, pain relief and antiretroviral drugs has become almost impossible. For Julian Valida a lab assistant who functions as the centre’s pharmacist, work has become incredibly stressful with the growing power cuts which means he must now keep drugs cold with only a few hours of power each day.

Julian Valida the lab assistant at the SOS health clinic in Bangui is very concerned about the lack of medical supplies making it into the Central African Republic from neighbouring Cameroon. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Julian Valida the lab assistant at the SOS health clinic in Bangui is very concerned about the lack of medical supplies making it into the Central African Republic from neighbouring Cameroon. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Dr Placide Bassenge spoke of the rising number of health issues since the rebels came to power in March. One of Dr Placide Bassenge’s greatest frustrations is his clinics limited resources, this means all serious cases must be referred to a hospital in Bangui. The problem with referring patients onwards is twofold. Firstly most patients coming to the clinic cant afford health care and secondly since the crisis many government departments including hospitals have been unable to pay their employees.

 

A child carries a bucket of water past Benedicte 12 years old, Mauricia 15 years old and Onela 11 years old who all live insideo House Courage at the SOS Childrens Village in Bangui. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

A child carries a bucket of water past Benedicte 12 years old, Mauricia 15 years old and Onela 11 years old who all live insideo House Courage at the SOS Childrens Village in Bangui. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

The road ahead for the Central African Republic will not be easy. The rise of self-defense militias and clashes between Christian and Muslim communities are now said to be part of daily life in parts of the mineral-rich country. In the last few days there has been serious calls for United Nations peacekeepers to be dispatched urgently to intervene with Christian-Muslim fighting which is at risk of spiralling into genocide.

Children from the SOS Childrens Village perform a traditional dance under the guidance of a dance teacher and drumming group. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

Children from the SOS Childrens Village perform a traditional dance under the guidance of a dance teacher and drumming group. Photo: Conor Ashleigh © 2013 All rights reserved.

I have worked on assignment for SOS Children’s Village throughout the world and during these trips have been warmly welcomed into communities in places as diverse as Haiti and Bangladesh. In the Central African Republic my experience was no exception and the hospitality I experienced first hand was deeply humbling. On my final night at the Children’s Village in Bangui, I sat with Jennifer the journalist I was working with and a number of the SOS Mothers lit only by a full moon.  We talked for hours and covered a range of topics from the nightmarish days when the Seleka arrived and looted the Children’s Village to a collection of funny memories since living inside the village. I flew out early the next morning after saying goodbye to the national office staff and the community development workers. Aboard my flight to Cameroon as we banked over a wide river that snaked through the landscape I bid farewell to the troubled country. While the nations future is uncertain, I was confident that the children who call the village home will always know the same love and care that exists during peace or turmoil.

 

Working with a writer

While in South Sudan last month, part of my trip was spent covering the second independence anniversary which I was lucky enough to do with an Australian journalist and all round good bloke, Ilya Gridneff. Our week together was jam packed and our efforts saw the words and pictures published in Fairfax’s The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and Daily Life as well as appearing in a number of smaller Fairfax papers throughout Australia.

 

A screen grab from one of our stories that is still up on SMH and The Age.

A screen grab from one of our stories that is still up on SMH and The Age.

 

Ilya recently relocated to Africa after leaving his job as a Fairfax crime reporter, you can read a piece from his time there here. Before leaving Australia we had briefly discussed the possibility of being in the region at the same time and how it would be cool to work together. After chatting further once Ilya was in Uganda’s capital Kampala it was obvious he needed to get out and see some more of the vast continent. From Nairobi where I was arranging my visa I told him he should do the same and soon enough Ilya was buzzing around Kamapala with passport photos and freshly filled out paperwork to pick up his own visa for South Sudan. With a visa and an overland bus ticket in hand, a few days later I saw Ilya in Juba and soon enough the adventure got into full swing, once of course we had every permit under the sun.

Ilya with a man of God at a national prayer to commemorate the second anniversary of independence.

Ilya with a man of God at a national prayer to commemorate the second anniversary of independence.

 

Working with Ilya was an absolute pleasure and during our time together based at Juba’s affordable London Star Hotel, I learnt how valuable it can be to team up with a journalist when it comes to the power of pitching. Essentially I can offer pictures and multimedia but once working with a journalist you can essentially offer a package for a story and it becomes much more valuable. While the power of pitching is increased working with a writer, I also believe we  do more justice to the overall story when there is a writer present at the events I am photographing. Ilya’s attention to detail and human interaction’s were impressive to watch, keep a look out for more work coming out of Africa from Ilya Gridneff.

 

My photos and Ilya Gridneff's words in SMH

 

Sadly all good things come to an end and after our week together I continued back to Malakal in the north-east of South Sudan where I was revisiting a community in Malakal whom I spent a week with in 2011, you can see pictures from that trip here.

I will be updating an edit of work from this recent trip in the coming days. For now you can see the photo essay Birth of a nation from my two months during independence in 2011 on my website to keep you excited.

 

http://www.conorashleigh.com/#/stories/birth-of-a-nation/South_Sudan-1

http://www.conorashleigh.com/#/stories/birth-of-a-nation/South_Sudan-1

 

 

Fading ages

Returning to Timor-Leste earlier in the year provoked many a thought about how to quantify progress in the majority world. Leaving my digital cameras, assignments and emails I started to shoot on my medium format film camera thinking less critically at what was around me but more my role as a visual communicator. With a different medium in hand and a much slower pace of movement I started to explore Timor-Leste looking for the remnants of pre-Portugese time,  Portugese colonisation, Indonesian occupation, the 1999 crisis and now today.

Here are a few photos from that trip to Timor-Leste earlier this year, more to come.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

Engaging Newcastle opening

Engaging Newcastle opening

Despite the bad weather on Friday night the launch of Engaging Newcastle at The Lock-Up Gallery was a great success with a full house. The gallery was packed with people from all walks of Newcastle’s broader community. Mazie Turner  a local artist opened the exhibition while myself and Sharon Douglas Manager, Community Partnerships at Newcastle University also spoke.

The following morning there was a feature article in the Newcastle Herald on the broader project of Engage Newcastle in which I was commissioned to document Newcastle communities. See the article below.

Article and my photos in weekend edition of Newcastle Herald

 

On Saturday morning I gave a floor talk inside The Lock-Up Gallery  this additional time to answer questions and share some of the memorable stories associated with living in the community for two weeks was great.

Photo- Oliver Nicholson © 2012. All rights reserved.

On Wednesday 22nd August the project and website will be launched here  so stay tuned for further updates. For those based in Newcastle next week you will be able to pick up Hunter Lifestyle Magazine which is running a five page feature of my photographs from this project so stay tuned!

Why people care about climate change

Why people care about climate change

Last week I visited two villages in Bangladesh that in three years time wont exist. The villages sit on river banks close to the Bay of Bengal in southern Bangladesh. Both villages are currently struggling to contain tidal surges that threaten the flood-protecting embankments which were built after the devastating Cyclone Aila in 2009.

Below a women outside her home in Jaliakhali village, Dacope area in southern Bangladesh. The family lost their original home during cyclone Aila, like others in the village the house is perched on a flood embankment built by NGOs after Cyclone Aila.

Photo- Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved.

 

It was on assignment for The Asia Foundation that I was able to visit one of the climate change hot spots in Bangladesh. One family who lost their homes during cyclone Aila and have since rebuilt along the embankment spoke of how their floor floods during high tide, while another man spoke of how his family has moved countless times in his lifetime alone.Walking along the narrow embankment that barely keeps the river from completely engulfing the remaining low lying villages I felt a weight of sadness.

After finishing the assignment I was struck by an evening of food poisoning (which I suspect ironically came from a lunch at one of the fancy hotels) this forced me to spend a day inside recovering. Taking a break from the assignment I turned to finalising a portrait series I photographed earlier in the year in my hometown of Newcastle, Australia Newcastle is the worlds largest exporter of black coal and has a strong and passionate community of environmentalists. Many of these people are dedicated to activism which is motivated from a deep responsibility to raise awareness for the implications of coal, which accounts for 1/3 of global greenhouse emissions.

 

Photo Conor Ashleigh © 2012 All rights reserved.

 

Over the last five years covering peaceful direct actions and protests primarily for breaking news I have regularly questioned how much impact my work is actually having. This thought spiral usually grows into brainstorming around how I coule more deeply engage an audience with my work. For Why climate change I asked people attending the annual blockade of Newcastle harbour to sit for me and also share a diary entry about why they care about climate change. Here is a link to the entire series http://conorashleigh.com/#/australia/why-climate-change/.

I was deeply humbled by the participants honesty and also how the portraits turned out. I am  inspired by the results so much so that I now see this concept as a long term project. There will be much more to come.

 

 

Qantas Spirit of Youth Awards

I was lucky enough to find out last week I have been named a finalist of the Qantas Spirit of Youth Awards for 2012, here is the link http://www.soya.com.au/entrants/10159637 to check out the page where you can like and share the page with friends on facebook and twitter.The power of social media in the last week has blown me away, after sharing with friends and family the page has jumped over 500 likes in less than a week.

SOYA awards